Regional Transportation Planning, Research, Investment Strategies, and Funding.

Governor Signs Into Law a Major State Transportation Funding Package
On July 15, Governor Jay Inslee signed into law major new statewide transportation revenue, project funding, and reform bills which will shape RTC’s regional transportation system performance and project funding for years to come. Major elements of the new laws (referred to as Connecting Washington) included: creating a 16-year funding plan for building major freeway and roadway projects, distributing a slice of the gas tax to local agencies, funding multiple discretionary grant programs, and enhancing multi-modal grants and direct funds to transit agencies across the state. Here in Clark County, the transportation funding package funds many of RTC’s high priority projects for freeways, arterial roadways, transit and ports. Detailed summaries of the transportation projects funded by Connecting Washington and associated summaries of discretionary grant programs and local agency funding are found here:
Monitoring Report Indicates Increased Bi-State Congestion
The RTC Board endorsed the Congestion Management Process 2014 Monitoring Report at their July 7 meeting. This report describes transportation conditions in the region at the street corridor level, including an assessment of traffic volumes, capacity, speeds, occupancy, safety, trucks, and transit. Report findings indicate the region needs to continue to focus on traffic management and operation improvements, add select capacity improvements, and address strong demand for bi-state travel.
RTC Selects Bike and Pedestrian Projects for Funding
On July 7, the RTC Board of Directors selected five bike and pedestrian projects to receive approximately $1.5 million in federal Transportation Alternatives Program funding. The projects are all community based projects that expand travel choices and improve the travel experience. All five projects will enhance bike and pedestrian mobility and safety.
Clark County Completes Hazel Dell Area Sidewalks
Clark County recently constructed sidewalks along the east side of NE Hazel Dell Ave and south side of NW/NE 68th Street. The project was constructed using $442,000 in federal Transportation Alternatives Program funds that were awarded by RTC.
Port of Vancouver Completes Transit Terminus to Port Center Path
The Port of Vancouver recently constructed a multi-modal path along the south side of SR-501/Lower River Road. The project was constructed using $289,600 in federal Transportation Alternatives Program funds that were awarded by RTC.
Klickitat County Completes 6th Street Sidewalk
Klickitat County recently constructed sidewalks along 6th Street in Lyle, Washington. The project was constructed using $125,000 in federal Transportation Alternatives Program funds that were awarded by RTC.
City of Stevenson Completes Trail of the Gods
The City of Stevenson recently completed the first phase of a multi-use trail linking the City of Stevenson to the Bridge of the Gods. The project was constructed using $66,400 in federal Transportation Alternatives Program funds that were awarded by RTC.
County to Upgrade Traffic Signal Technology
RTC’s VAST program continues investment in advanced signal systems countywide. The Vancouver Area Smart Trek Program, managed by RTC, provided funds to Clark County for the Signal Timing, Evaluation, Verification and Enhancement, or STEVE, project. The project will provide the ability for real time traffic management on major urban roadways in the County.
Big Data in Transportation and Urban Planning
RTC’s partnership initiative in planning and deployment of the Portal traffic data archive and analysis tool is highlighted in an industry blog. From the article: “The Urban Planning and Transportation domains are undergoing a major change in data collection and usage. Two major factors contributing to this change are: first, a significant increase in deployment of urban sensors - increases both in the number and type of sensors - and, second, a demand for measuring performance and making decisions based on collected data from those sensors.”
I-205 Access and Operations Study Published
The RTC Board adopted recommendations, in November 2014, to address long- and short-term roadway improvements and transit operations in the I-205 corridor, as well a set of operational policies for regional freeway corridors in the region. They identified a core set of long term capital projects and a set of near term operational improvements for I-205. The analysis, findings and recommendations are described in the I-205 Access and Operations Study Report.
Clark County RTP: 2014 Update Adopted
The RTC Board adopted a 2014 update to the Regional Transportation Plan for Clark County (RTP) at its December 2 meeting. The RTP is the long-range, twenty-plus year, transportation plan required by federal and state governments as a pre-condition for receipt of federal and state transportation funding to this region. Adoption of the 2014 Plan concluded a year-long process during which Plan elements, such as regional transportation policies, demographic projections and transportation projects and strategies, were reviewed and updated.
Demographic Report: County Population Diversifying with Steady Growth
Demographers looking at national population data have identified three major trends of note – the population is growing; the population is aging; and the population is becoming more diverse. Theses national trends are playing out here in Clark County as well. To provide a foundation for the update to the Regional Transportation Plan, RTC has published a demographic profile for Clark County.